Key Passage

Key Passage Analysis: Read the passage from Snow Flower and the Secret Fan. Write an essay about it, illuminating a particular idea in the text that connects to your understanding of the novel as a whole (so far). Think about themes and motifs as well as style. Which of those stands out to you? Use the text to support your response.
…This didn’t mean—once her fate had been sealed—that she embraced it. No, she struggled against everything in her early months, even tearing off her bindings completely one time. “my mother bound my feet—and me to the chair—even tighter the next time.”
“You can’t fight your fate,” I said. “It is predestined.”
“My mother says the same thing,” Snow Flower responded. “She untied me only to walk to break my bones and to let me us the chamber pot. All the time, I looked out our lattice window. I watched the birds fly by. I followed the clouds on their travels. I studied the moon as it grew larger, then shrank. So much happened outside my window that I almost forgot what was happening inside that room.”
How these sentiments scared me! Snow Flower had the true independent streak of the horse sign, only her horse had wings that carried her far above the earth, while mine had a plodding nature. But a feeling in the pit of my stomach—of something naughty, of pushing against the boundaries of our preordained lives—gave me an internal thrill that in time would become a deep craving. (pages 56-57)

Key Passage Analysis: Read the passage from Snow Flower and the Secret Fan. Write an essay about it, illuminating a particular idea in the text that connects to your understanding of the novel as a whole (so far). Think about themes and motifs as well as style. Which of those stands out to you? Use the text to support your response.

…This didn’t mean—once her fate had been sealed—that she embraced it. No, she struggled against everything in her early months, even tearing off her bindings completely one time. “my mother bound my feet—and me to the chair—even tighter the next time.”
“You can’t fight your fate,” I said. “It is predestined.”

“My mother says the same thing,” Snow Flower responded. “She untied me only to walk to break my bones and to let me us the chamber pot. All the time, I looked out our lattice window. I watched the birds fly by. I followed the clouds on their travels. I studied the moon as it grew larger, then shrank. So much happened outside my window that I almost forgot what was happening inside that room.”How these sentiments scared me! Snow Flower had the true independent streak of the horse sign, only her horse had wings that carried her far above the earth, while mine had a plodding nature. But a feeling in the pit of my stomach—of something naughty, of pushing against the boundaries of our preordained lives—gave me an internal thrill that in time would become a deep craving. (pages 56-57)